Random fun things are random! I am an illustrator, and I enjoy artwork and video games. And anime, of course. And music. Yeah, so all of that. :3

20th October 2014

Photo reblogged from All hail the PacaPrincess with 10,045 notes

science-fantasy:

If you play Pokemon X and Y and you are intending on getting a shiny Gengar from the Gengar event at GameStop, PLEASE READ THIS POST!
I went to GameStop today intending to get my free shiny Gengar (as all of the posters said, free. FREE as in NO PURCHASE NECESSARY) and the employee behind the counter told the customer in front of me that they could only get a card for a shiny Gengar if they pre-ordered Omega Ruby or Alpha Sapphire. That sounded like really shady bullshit to me, so I got out of line, eyed the poster, saw absolutely nothing about pre-ordering being necessary, said “bullshit,” and left. Later, I googled the event and found an entire reddit thread of people who had the same experience. On this thread, I discovered that GameStop said on its own Facebook page that there is no purchase necessary, and that evidently, some stores have been told to tell customers they had to pre-order. Surprise surprise, GameStop has shitty business practices. Someone on the thread eventually found a store with a manager that insisted that they were supposed to be free and that the other stores were scamming customers.

If this happens to you, DO NOT pay for anything. GameStop is a terrible business as we all know and they do not need your pre-order money. Show them the poster IN THEIR OWN STORE that says “no purchase necessary,” or if it doesn’t, pull up this picture on GameStop’s Facebook page in which it says no purchase necessary on the poster.
I reported this store to Nintendo’s customer service, and they were totally on my side. They said that there is absolutely no purchase or pre-order necessary, they took the store’s information, and took my information in case they need to verify anything more with me. She said that if I know of any other stores that are doing this to report them as well. They even took my serial number just in case they can get me a code directly. Nintendo customer service 10/10. GameStop 0/10.
Here’s Nintendo’s number in case the same thing happens to you: 1-800-255-3700. I don’t recommend calling GameStop, because you never know whether they’re going to be unbiased about it. Nintendo, on the other hand, wants people’s free Pokemon to be free.
Please tell other people about this so they don’t get scammed. Goddamn I hate GameStop.

science-fantasy:

If you play Pokemon X and Y and you are intending on getting a shiny Gengar from the Gengar event at GameStop, PLEASE READ THIS POST!

I went to GameStop today intending to get my free shiny Gengar (as all of the posters said, free. FREE as in NO PURCHASE NECESSARY) and the employee behind the counter told the customer in front of me that they could only get a card for a shiny Gengar if they pre-ordered Omega Ruby or Alpha Sapphire. That sounded like really shady bullshit to me, so I got out of line, eyed the poster, saw absolutely nothing about pre-ordering being necessary, said “bullshit,” and left. Later, I googled the event and found an entire reddit thread of people who had the same experience. On this thread, I discovered that GameStop said on its own Facebook page that there is no purchase necessary, and that evidently, some stores have been told to tell customers they had to pre-order. Surprise surprise, GameStop has shitty business practices. Someone on the thread eventually found a store with a manager that insisted that they were supposed to be free and that the other stores were scamming customers.

If this happens to you, DO NOT pay for anything. GameStop is a terrible business as we all know and they do not need your pre-order money. Show them the poster IN THEIR OWN STORE that says “no purchase necessary,” or if it doesn’t, pull up this picture on GameStop’s Facebook page in which it says no purchase necessary on the poster.

I reported this store to Nintendo’s customer service, and they were totally on my side. They said that there is absolutely no purchase or pre-order necessary, they took the store’s information, and took my information in case they need to verify anything more with me. She said that if I know of any other stores that are doing this to report them as well. They even took my serial number just in case they can get me a code directly. Nintendo customer service 10/10. GameStop 0/10.

Here’s Nintendo’s number in case the same thing happens to you: 1-800-255-3700. I don’t recommend calling GameStop, because you never know whether they’re going to be unbiased about it. Nintendo, on the other hand, wants people’s free Pokemon to be free.

Please tell other people about this so they don’t get scammed. Goddamn I hate GameStop.

Source: science-fantasy

15th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Psych2go with 3,421 notes

vicemag:

This Is What Developing Acute Schizophrenia Feels Like
A year ago this winter, I began to not recognize myself. 
Sleep was the first thing to change. Progressively, over the course of about two weeks, I began struggling to drift off. As a 24-year-old man with a good supply of hash, this had never been a problem before. It was so odd. Seemingly out of the blue, I’d get into bed at night and not be able to shut off my brain. Thoughts would grow tendrils and loop onto other thoughts, tangling together like a big wall of ivy. Some nights, I’d pull the covers over my head, grab my face hard in my hands, and whisper, “Shut. The. Fuck. Up.”
Eventually I would be able to get to sleep, but I’d wake up feeling peculiar, like I had forgotten to do or tell someone something. Hunger wasn’t as aggressive as it usually was during this time, either. Normally I bolt downstairs to pour a heaping bowl of Frosted Flakes the second my eyes open. Instead, I woke each morning with a sick, creeping feeling in my gut. Still, I carried on as normal, thinking I’d just lay off the hash for a bit. That was probably it. I wasn’t panicked. 
I carried on my work at a local wine shop and tried to push what was happening during the night to the back of my mind. I got through the days OK, if slightly bleary-eyed—but looking back now I can see that I had started to struggle with simple conversations. 
If my boss told me to check a delivery, it’d take me a few seconds to process what he was saying, like two or three people had said it at the same time and I couldn’t make out the clear instruction. Looking at morning delivery slips and trying to make sense of them in my head was like trying to make out a tree in the fog—possible, but hard.
Continue

vicemag:

This Is What Developing Acute Schizophrenia Feels Like

A year ago this winter, I began to not recognize myself. 

Sleep was the first thing to change. Progressively, over the course of about two weeks, I began struggling to drift off. As a 24-year-old man with a good supply of hash, this had never been a problem before. It was so odd. Seemingly out of the blue, I’d get into bed at night and not be able to shut off my brain. Thoughts would grow tendrils and loop onto other thoughts, tangling together like a big wall of ivy. Some nights, I’d pull the covers over my head, grab my face hard in my hands, and whisper, “Shut. The. Fuck. Up.”

Eventually I would be able to get to sleep, but I’d wake up feeling peculiar, like I had forgotten to do or tell someone something. Hunger wasn’t as aggressive as it usually was during this time, either. Normally I bolt downstairs to pour a heaping bowl of Frosted Flakes the second my eyes open. Instead, I woke each morning with a sick, creeping feeling in my gut. Still, I carried on as normal, thinking I’d just lay off the hash for a bit. That was probably it. I wasn’t panicked. 

I carried on my work at a local wine shop and tried to push what was happening during the night to the back of my mind. I got through the days OK, if slightly bleary-eyed—but looking back now I can see that I had started to struggle with simple conversations. 

If my boss told me to check a delivery, it’d take me a few seconds to process what he was saying, like two or three people had said it at the same time and I couldn’t make out the clear instruction. Looking at morning delivery slips and trying to make sense of them in my head was like trying to make out a tree in the fog—possible, but hard.

Continue

Source: Vice Magazine

8th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from CaveMonster's Stash with 526,136 notes

bigcavemonster:

callistoprime:

kemlocaesar:

captainfluffatun:

vixyhoovesmod:

1los:

heather franzen

thats adorable

Oh my god

callistoprime

:’)

i always reblog this comic

Source: 1los

8th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Andy Needs Help with 95,618 notes

boo-author:

bitterseafigtree:

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.
Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.
Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.
"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.
But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.
The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.
Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.
"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.
Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.
“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.
Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.
http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

Kids can’t share now? Or trade lunches? What the actual fuck is happening?

I think this article is talking around what the actual issue is.The student who was “given a cheese sandwich” and “couldn’t get a normal lunch?”That’s how schools handle students whose families can’t pay their lunch bills. They’re required to give the kid something, so they get a slice of processed cheese between two pieces of white bread. Cheese sandwich.All those stories about the kids who went through the lines and then had their trays taken away and dumped in the trash in front of them because their account was $5 in the red when they got to the end of the line?Those kids were given cheese sandwiches.This isn’t about allergies. I guarantee you that kids at those tables are swapping food all the time. It’s part of the school cafeteria experience.If the second kid was allergic to the burrito, we’d be reading a different story.It’s because this kid undermined the system that is supposed to punish students for their parents’ “negligence” (poverty).

boo-author:

bitterseafigtree:

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.

Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.

Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.

"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.

But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.

The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.

Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.

"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.

Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.

“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.

Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.

http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

Kids can’t share now? Or trade lunches? What the actual fuck is happening?

I think this article is talking around what the actual issue is.

The student who was “given a cheese sandwich” and “couldn’t get a normal lunch?”

That’s how schools handle students whose families can’t pay their lunch bills. They’re required to give the kid something, so they get a slice of processed cheese between two pieces of white bread. Cheese sandwich.

All those stories about the kids who went through the lines and then had their trays taken away and dumped in the trash in front of them because their account was $5 in the red when they got to the end of the line?

Those kids were given cheese sandwiches.

This isn’t about allergies. I guarantee you that kids at those tables are swapping food all the time. It’s part of the school cafeteria experience.

If the second kid was allergic to the burrito, we’d be reading a different story.

It’s because this kid undermined the system that is supposed to punish students for their parents’ “negligence” (poverty).

Source: thinksquad

7th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from CORY LOFTIS with 5,408 notes

coryloftis:

Some more Wildstar.  I forget how much art was made for this game.  I think if we measured it in craptons, there would be about 14.2 bajillion.  I invented that nonsense alien alphabet to get around localizing text for other countries.  Sidestepped that headache.

7th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from CaveMonster's Stash with 14,783 notes

Source: not-in-love-amnesia

5th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from Alternative Pokemon Art with 78,624 notes

alternative-pokemon-art:

nudityandnecromancy:

theinquisitionsendsitsregards:

iguanamouth:

the fourth set of commissioned unusual dragon hoards ! looks like the breakfast and comic book hoarders might be cousins huh ? ? 

(part 1) (part 2) (part 3)

HOARD OF DICE

…I knew a guy with a hoard of dice, it makes sense, in retrospect, that he must have been a dragon.

I know this isn’t Pokemon, but I love these to death. 

The dice dragon looks so happy to just be sitting there holding a dice.

Source: iguanamouth

5th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Art Reference Blog with 27,796 notes

yopatrick:

Some good tips about comic lettering from Nate Piekos of Blambot.com

Source: yopatrick

24th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from cammykitten with 2,925 notes

koulsarl:

ca-tsuka:

Ghost in the Shell poster by Martin Ansin for MondoCon.

holy balls where do you even print holographics D: so dope!

Source: ca-tsuka

23rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Happy Landfill with 8,498 notes

Source: kyoukan